"Britain can be cancelled, top EU lawyer says" so read a headline on the CNN website. It certainly feels like it. A divided nation, a crippled Government and a Leader of the Opposition who transparently covets investors' hard earned savings. The nation is crying out for strong leadership but few of our current crop of politicians come close and Parliament merely mirrors the divisions across the nation. As the old joke advises, you really don't want to start from here. It is perhaps not a surprise therefore that this has been the worst year for UK financial markets since the Great Recession in 2008 and the FTSE 100 is back down to a level first seen in 1999. Thankfully, we have positioned our portfolios with limited exposure to equities, particularly in the UK and this has helped provide some insulation for our portfolios.

Perversely, the principal cause of the markets' woes was not UK related but more global in nature and, in particular, American. Stock markets began to feel the chill draft of the US 10 year Treasury bond topping 3.2% in late September, triggering the global market correction that began in October. At the time, it appeared to be a replay of February's valuation recalibration in response to a higher discount rate. However, many weeks later, nerves have yet to settle despite Treasury prices rallying; the 10 year note is now yielding below 2.9%. Unlike in February, the hitherto market leaders have been pummelled and the ecommerce giants seem have lost their air of invincibility. This is despite Q3 earnings leaping by 24% and President Trump's tax cuts accounting for only part of this bounty.