I am in the process of transferring into the office some of my investment related books. Within the pile, I came across a couple of books which I had purposely set aside unread. Having worked at a bank during the credit crisis, I had little desire to revisit those traumatic days through Andrew Ross Sorkin's 'Too Big to Fail' and Greg Zuckerman's 'The Greatest Trade Ever'. Ten years on, I thought that I was finally composed enough to read them. Of the two, Sorkin's is the better, but Zuckerman's is a useful complement by describing the other side of the trade. Sorkin's book is a gripping read, but even now I found it as soothing as a Stephen King horror story and stressful to recount what happened.

I came away from the books with some interesting observations. The crisis was very slow moving in the early stages, many people recognised that something was seriously afoot but it took a long while for the storm to build up to its full force. Subsequent to the Bear Sterns/BNP hedge fund collapse in 2007, bids for sub-prime paper essentially evaporated. Yet prices remained high as no holders of the dodgy paper dared to sell. When the underlying fundamentals of illiquid assets change, it can take a long time to discover what the true price is. Especially when the counterparty with the power has a strong incentive to mask the news.